#WeirdCarWednesday

#WeirdCarWednesday

During the month of September, we posted some of the strangest cars to ever enter our detail shop to Instagram in a little something we like to call #WeirdCarWednesday. We’ve rounded up the four cars we featured below, along with a little history on each one. Enjoy! 

1960 BMW 600 (AKA Isetta 600)

Yellow 1960 BMW 600

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In Europe’s depressed post-war economy, BMW found a hit in the Isetta, an Italian-designed 2-seater micro-car. But sales started to dip in the late 1950s as fuel shortages ended and consumers began buying larger 4-seaters. Without the funds to develop a new mid-size car from whole cloth, BMW instead adapted the Isetta design to a roomier, 4-seat microcar dubbed the BMW 600, beginning production mid-1957.

The car flopped instantly, and with BMW on the precipice of bankruptcy, that kind of failure could not be sustained. By the end of 1959 production ceased, and the 600 was no more. But it did have one lasting impact—the semi-trailing arm rear suspension arrangement it introduced stayed with BMW well into the 90’s. 

When this micro-car came into the shop, we gave it the PlasmaCoat treatment and sent it on its way. Really brought out the goldenrod color! 

1969 Oldsmobile 4-4-2 in Matte Black

1969 Oldsmobile 4-4-6 in Matte Black

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Originally an option package for the F-85 and Cutlass, the 4-4-2 was treated as its own model between 1968 and 1971. The “442” moniker refers to the muscle car’s four-barrel carburetor, four-speed manual transmission, and dual exhausts. The owner of this 4-4-2 had the vehicle painted in matte black paint, giving it an imposing visage. 

We gave this stealth-style 4-4-2 the Matte Paint Coating Pro treatment to keep the paintwork in pristine condition. 

2002 Qvale Mangusta

2002 Qvale Mangusta

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When Alejandro de Tomaso asked Maserati technical director Giordano Casarini what the next step for De Tomaso brand be, he said they should make a sports car in the style of the TVR Griffith. A protoype was completed by 1996, but De Tomaso needed more money to finish the car. So, they turned to the Qvale family, who imported Maseratis to North America. 

But as the Mangusta finally launched in 2000, the Qvale-De Tomaso relationship broke down, with Qvale ordering the De Tomaso badging be removed and replaced with Qvale badging. This put dealers in an odd position since a number of Mangustas had already been sold, resulting in early purchasers having to their cars for ones with the Qvale badge. Sales were poor due to the car’s strange design and lack of brand recognition, with only 284 being built during its 3 year production. 

This Mangusta received a Nano-Resin coating to keep the Tigre Yellow paint in perfect shape. 

2009 Lotus Exige S

2009 Lotus Exige S

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Between its odd design, bare-bones features and cramped interior, this car isn’t exactly daily driver material. But it’s definitely a lot of fun at the track. Sporting the insectoid design features Lotus has become infamous for, the Exige S’s appearance is safely on the weirder side of sports car design.

Which #WeirdCarWednesday is your favorite? Comment below!